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Wood Species

The United States produces hardwood lumber for many countries around the world. What makes North American hardwood outstanding?

  • The United States and much of the world use the timber from hardwood trees to build everything from railroad ties to quality home furnishings.
  • People appreciate hardwoods for their beauty and warmth. We use hardwood trees to produce cabinetry, flooring, millwork, and furniture for homes and businesses.
  • Each unique tree produces wood with a distinctive grain pattern and texture. This variety in detail adds to the beauty of the solid wood furniture.
  • If a limb falls off while a tree is growing and maturing, it leaves behind a knot on the wood surface. These natural markings give individual character to hardwoods.
  • Hardwoods are durable and stable.

Keep reading to learn about the specific characteristics of each type of hardwood we offer. With so many excellent choices, you will be sure to find a wood type that fits your needs and preferences!


Janka Hardness Scale

In our wood descriptions, we include the numbers from the Janka Hardness Scale. What do we mean by “Janka Hardness Scale”? This test measures the force needed to embed a .444-inch steel ball up to half its diameter into the wood. The hardwood industry uses this scale to gauge how effective each type of hardwood will be in tolerating normal wear and denting. The Janka hardness number also indicates how much effort it will take to nail and saw a specific wood type. The higher the number, the tougher the wood.


Red Oak

Red Oak

Red Oak, durable and wear-resistant, boasts an orange-reddish tint. The sapwood has a white to light brown color. This wood has an open grain. The open grain absorbs the stain and becomes darker where the wood grain is close and lighter where the wood grain is open. Red Oak gives a warm, inviting look. On the Janka Hardness Scale, it has a rating of 1290.


Quarter Sawn Oak

Quarter Sawn Oak

Quarter Sawn Oak is cut at a 90-degree angle to a tree's growth rings, giving it a unique grain pattern. Do you enjoy furniture with texture? Quarter Sawn Oak has a rich texture. Its tight grain exhibits dramatic light and dark tones. This natural color contrast becomes even more pronounced with staining.

Quarter Sawn Oak has a cooler white to sage hue. Just like the Red Oak, this lumber endures the wear and tear of everyday use. On the Janka Hardness Scale, it has a rating of 1360.


Cherry

Cherry

Cherry wood is known for having heartwood with a vibrant red to reddish brown color. The creamy white sapwood darkens over time when exposed to light and heat. Cherry wood sometimes naturally has small pit pockets and brown pith flecks.

A softer wood, Cherry rates at 950 on the Janka Hardness scale. It may dent more easily under heavy use. Cherry's natural reddish hue intensifies when stained with one of the cherry stains. After staining, the fine grain of the wood appears even-toned. Cherry wood has a circular grain pattern and a satin-smooth texture, lovely for cabinets and furniture.


Maple

Maple

Do you enjoy light-colored furnishings? Maple may be the wood for you! Maple’s heartwood can vary from a light to a dark golden brown. The creamy white sapwood has a golden tint. Maple’s light tone accents the stain color, making it appear bright and bold. This wood captures the light and cheers up any room in your house!

Maple, one of the hardest types of domestic wood in the United States, endures heavy use. It has a light, circular grain pattern and a close, fine texture. The wood’s hardness may keep the stain from soaking into it well, creating darker stained areas and giving it an original appearance. Maple is rated at 1450 on the Janka Hardness Scale.


Walnut

Walnut

Walnut’s rich, chocolate color with hints of black, gray, and even dark blue make it a beautiful, complex wood. Over time, walnut turns slightly golden brown. The change is so small that it often goes unnoticed.

Walnut, the only dark brown hardwood grown in the USA, possesses a lovely grain pattern. Wouldn’t walnut be perfect for your new bedroom suite? Walnut’s rating on the Janka Hardness Scale is 1010.


Hickory

Hickory

Hickory, the strongest wood type we offer, has a rating of 1820. Its contrasting reddish-cream color makes it a popular choice for furniture. The medium grain has a smooth look and an earthy feel. Hickory lumber looks good anywhere you need a new piece of furniture.


Elm

Elm

Elm often has an irregular grain, giving it a wild beauty. A ring-porous wood, Elm has an open grain similar to oak. Although the color of elm varies, the sapwood is usually white or grayish-white. The heartwood of elm ranges in color from a reddish brown to a light tan.

Elm’s beauty and durability make it a popular wood that has been used for many years. Elm rates at 769 on the Janka Hardness scale. Because elm has a lower number than many of the other hardwoods, it is considered a “soft hardwood.”


Pine

Pine

Another option for light-colored wood, pine has a white or yellow hue. It often has brown knots in the wood, adding a decorative effect to furniture. Knotty pine looks good in rustic, country-style furniture.

Pinewood resists shrinking and swelling. Pine trees come in a large variety of species. The Janka Hardness rating varies significantly from one species of pine tree to the next.


Barnwood

Barnwood

Our barnwood, reclaimed from old structures such as barns, factories, and warehouses, gives your furniture an extraordinary appeal. No two pieces of barnwood match exactly. Purchase a piece of furniture made from barnwood, and you won't be able to find a replica in any other home!

Do you enjoy a rustic appearance? Barnwood has marks like nail holes that make it unique. It has multiple shades of coloring that comes from varying amounts of time in the sunshine and rain.

Consider a piece of furniture made from barnwood for that room you would like to decorate in an old-fashioned, country style!